<%3Fxml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"%3F> <%3Fxml-stylesheet href="/components/com_jcomments/tpl/default/style.css?v=10" type="text/css"%3F> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! Articles, News, and photos on tourism and travel to the countries of the African Diaspora http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php 2012-06-29T23:53:55Z Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2012-02-27T16:07:16Z 2012-02-27T16:07:16Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=763:the-harley-davidson-black-riding-culture&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Administrator kpope100@yahoo.com <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <img height="255" width="340" src="images/stories/harley.jpg" alt="harley" style="margin: 4px; float: right;" />Did you know that the Harley-Davidson Motorcycle has been the preferred bike for African Americans since its early days? I learned this and other interesting information on a media trip put on by Harley-Davidson. &nbsp;As a tribute to Black History Month, the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee opened an exhibit exploring the evolution of African American motorcycle culture. Through this exhibit that debuted on February 10<sup>th</sup>, Harley-Davidson recognized the contributions of African Americans who helped to create the Harley-Davidson motorcycling experience and culture. The exhibit is now open to the public where you can learn many things about blacks’ relationships with Harley-Davidson and the black riding culture.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Media from all over the United States came to Milwaukee for three days to be a part of the Harley-Davidson celebration of Black History Month.&nbsp;Travel writers from various print and online publications and broadcast media got to tour the museum, the dealership, the manufacturing plant and enjoy festivities presented by Harley-Davidson. The group stayed at the Iron Horse Hotel where they enjoyed meals at the hotel’s restaurants.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;During the three-day stay, media learned all about the history of Harley-Davidson and got to see many of the styles of bikes built by the company since its beginning in 1903 up until the present. At the dealership we even got to test drive one of the motorcycles and at the plant we got to see how the bikes were made. We also enjoyed speaking with some early black riders who were a part of clubs like the Buffalo Soldiers, East Bay dragons and the Chosen Few. One early rider present was a man that goes by the name of P. Wee, a popular club leader who once had his own shop. “He said he never considered that he would be a part of Harley-Davidson history. He said he just loved the bikes and liked to ride.”</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; During our visit we also learned about Benny Hardy, a black custom bike builder who helped to create what is considered one of the most famous motorcycles in the world, Captain America that was featured in the iconic motorcycle movie, Easy Rider.&nbsp;We got to meet and speak with someone who was taught by Hardy, a man who everyone calls Sugar Bear. He also customized his own chopper that was showcased in the main entrance to the museum for the black history exhibit.&nbsp;Attending this event also were a&nbsp;few female riders who were just as enthused about their Harleys as the men. They told us about the stereotypes they faced as women riders. Despite some of the stereotypes, women are still riding Harleys more and more, and loving it. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;The Harley-Davidson Black History museum exhibit includes bikes, documents, photos and memorabilia of Harley-Davidson legendary riders like William B. Johnson, the first African American Harley-Davidson dealer and Bessie Stringfield, the first known African American woman to ride cross-country on a Harley motorcycle in the 1930s and 1940s all by herself. The black history exhibit gives bike enthusiasts and the general public a chance to connect with and understand the black riding culture. Through this exhibit African Americans get to see how they played a part in the history Harley-Davidson.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<img height="233" width="375" src="images/stories/harley_davidson_club.jpg" alt="harley_davidson_club" style="margin: 4px; float: left;" />The Harley-Davidson brand is indeed the bike of choice for many black riders still today. It is number one motor cycle in terms of sales and popularity among African Americans, who have been riding and forming clubs since motor cycles became popular. The legendary members as well as modern-day members seemed very proud of their Harley-Davidson bikes which many said they would not trade for the world. Some of the early riders have had as many as three or four bikes and still ride today.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;"African Americans have influenced and helped shape motorcycle culture throughout our history. Riding culture is seen differently today because of their numerous contributions to it," said John Comissiong, director of African American outreach marketing, Harley-Davidson Motor Company. "We're number one in sales to African Americans, and not only are we very proud of our shared history, we're always looking for new stories to tell."</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Early riders present at this event shared their stories of riding their Harley's across country, and riding with clubs and their significant others. You can read stories about the black riding culture on Iron Elite, a community section of the Harley-Davidson website showcasing African American rider stories, motorcycle customization and legendary riders. On the site you can also&nbsp;view customized bikes and learn more about key African American motorcyclists who have made significant impacts on the sport of motorcycling.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Members of the media were impressed and honored with the Harley-Davidson African-American exhibit which will remain at the Harley-Davidson Museum for some time this year. Most came away with a lot of information that they had not known. Many made friends with some of the riders and owner of bikes, and planned to attend some of the biking events supported by Harley-Davidson. Such events include Atlantic Beach Bike Week, Daytona Black Bike Week and the National Bikers Round-Up, where thousands of African American riders gather in the spirit of true riding culture.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; To top off the three-day festivities honoring black riding culture and contributions, all participants received a very nice Harley-Davidson jacket. &nbsp;The group came away delighted to have been able to learn about the evolution of the Harley-Davidson motorcycle culture through the eyes of African American riders. Some even came away with a desire to learn more about motorcycling&nbsp;while others&nbsp;vowed to own a Harley-Davidson bike and become part of the riding culture. At any rate,&nbsp;this event that seemed to echo the theme ‘once you get your hands on a Harley-Davidson, you’ll never let go,’ was definitely a success.</p> <p><strong>About the Harley-Davidson Museum</strong> <br />The Harley-Davidson Museum is a reflection of American history and pop culture through the lens of a true American icon and brand. The Museum offers a one-of-a-kind experience for riders and non-riders alike with rare artifacts exhibits and stories. For more information on the Museum's galleries, special events, tickets, hours and more, visit <a target="_blank" href="http://www.h-dmuseum.com/">www.h-dmuseum.com</a><span style="text-decoration: underline;">.&nbsp; </span></p> <p><strong>About Harley-Davidson Motor Company - </strong>Harley-Davidson Motor Company, the only major U.S.-based motorcycle manufacturer produces heavyweight motorcycles and a complete line of motorcycle parts, accessories and general merchandise. For more information, visit Harley-Davidson's Web site at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.harley-davidson.com/">www.harley-davidson.com</a>.</p> <p> </p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <img height="255" width="340" src="images/stories/harley.jpg" alt="harley" style="margin: 4px; float: right;" />Did you know that the Harley-Davidson Motorcycle has been the preferred bike for African Americans since its early days? I learned this and other interesting information on a media trip put on by Harley-Davidson. &nbsp;As a tribute to Black History Month, the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee opened an exhibit exploring the evolution of African American motorcycle culture. Through this exhibit that debuted on February 10<sup>th</sup>, Harley-Davidson recognized the contributions of African Americans who helped to create the Harley-Davidson motorcycling experience and culture. The exhibit is now open to the public where you can learn many things about blacks’ relationships with Harley-Davidson and the black riding culture.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Media from all over the United States came to Milwaukee for three days to be a part of the Harley-Davidson celebration of Black History Month.&nbsp;Travel writers from various print and online publications and broadcast media got to tour the museum, the dealership, the manufacturing plant and enjoy festivities presented by Harley-Davidson. The group stayed at the Iron Horse Hotel where they enjoyed meals at the hotel’s restaurants.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;During the three-day stay, media learned all about the history of Harley-Davidson and got to see many of the styles of bikes built by the company since its beginning in 1903 up until the present. At the dealership we even got to test drive one of the motorcycles and at the plant we got to see how the bikes were made. We also enjoyed speaking with some early black riders who were a part of clubs like the Buffalo Soldiers, East Bay dragons and the Chosen Few. One early rider present was a man that goes by the name of P. Wee, a popular club leader who once had his own shop. “He said he never considered that he would be a part of Harley-Davidson history. He said he just loved the bikes and liked to ride.”</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; During our visit we also learned about Benny Hardy, a black custom bike builder who helped to create what is considered one of the most famous motorcycles in the world, Captain America that was featured in the iconic motorcycle movie, Easy Rider.&nbsp;We got to meet and speak with someone who was taught by Hardy, a man who everyone calls Sugar Bear. He also customized his own chopper that was showcased in the main entrance to the museum for the black history exhibit.&nbsp;Attending this event also were a&nbsp;few female riders who were just as enthused about their Harleys as the men. They told us about the stereotypes they faced as women riders. Despite some of the stereotypes, women are still riding Harleys more and more, and loving it. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;The Harley-Davidson Black History museum exhibit includes bikes, documents, photos and memorabilia of Harley-Davidson legendary riders like William B. Johnson, the first African American Harley-Davidson dealer and Bessie Stringfield, the first known African American woman to ride cross-country on a Harley motorcycle in the 1930s and 1940s all by herself. The black history exhibit gives bike enthusiasts and the general public a chance to connect with and understand the black riding culture. Through this exhibit African Americans get to see how they played a part in the history Harley-Davidson.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<img height="233" width="375" src="images/stories/harley_davidson_club.jpg" alt="harley_davidson_club" style="margin: 4px; float: left;" />The Harley-Davidson brand is indeed the bike of choice for many black riders still today. It is number one motor cycle in terms of sales and popularity among African Americans, who have been riding and forming clubs since motor cycles became popular. The legendary members as well as modern-day members seemed very proud of their Harley-Davidson bikes which many said they would not trade for the world. Some of the early riders have had as many as three or four bikes and still ride today.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;"African Americans have influenced and helped shape motorcycle culture throughout our history. Riding culture is seen differently today because of their numerous contributions to it," said John Comissiong, director of African American outreach marketing, Harley-Davidson Motor Company. "We're number one in sales to African Americans, and not only are we very proud of our shared history, we're always looking for new stories to tell."</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Early riders present at this event shared their stories of riding their Harley's across country, and riding with clubs and their significant others. You can read stories about the black riding culture on Iron Elite, a community section of the Harley-Davidson website showcasing African American rider stories, motorcycle customization and legendary riders. On the site you can also&nbsp;view customized bikes and learn more about key African American motorcyclists who have made significant impacts on the sport of motorcycling.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Members of the media were impressed and honored with the Harley-Davidson African-American exhibit which will remain at the Harley-Davidson Museum for some time this year. Most came away with a lot of information that they had not known. Many made friends with some of the riders and owner of bikes, and planned to attend some of the biking events supported by Harley-Davidson. Such events include Atlantic Beach Bike Week, Daytona Black Bike Week and the National Bikers Round-Up, where thousands of African American riders gather in the spirit of true riding culture.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; To top off the three-day festivities honoring black riding culture and contributions, all participants received a very nice Harley-Davidson jacket. &nbsp;The group came away delighted to have been able to learn about the evolution of the Harley-Davidson motorcycle culture through the eyes of African American riders. Some even came away with a desire to learn more about motorcycling&nbsp;while others&nbsp;vowed to own a Harley-Davidson bike and become part of the riding culture. At any rate,&nbsp;this event that seemed to echo the theme ‘once you get your hands on a Harley-Davidson, you’ll never let go,’ was definitely a success.</p> <p><strong>About the Harley-Davidson Museum</strong> <br />The Harley-Davidson Museum is a reflection of American history and pop culture through the lens of a true American icon and brand. The Museum offers a one-of-a-kind experience for riders and non-riders alike with rare artifacts exhibits and stories. For more information on the Museum's galleries, special events, tickets, hours and more, visit <a target="_blank" href="http://www.h-dmuseum.com/">www.h-dmuseum.com</a><span style="text-decoration: underline;">.&nbsp; </span></p> <p><strong>About Harley-Davidson Motor Company - </strong>Harley-Davidson Motor Company, the only major U.S.-based motorcycle manufacturer produces heavyweight motorcycles and a complete line of motorcycle parts, accessories and general merchandise. For more information, visit Harley-Davidson's Web site at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.harley-davidson.com/">www.harley-davidson.com</a>.</p> <p> </p> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2011-09-17T15:11:03Z 2011-09-17T15:11:03Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=667:north-african-vegetable-couscous&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Administrator kpope100@yahoo.com <p><img height="256" width="384" src="images/stories/couscous1_morocco.jpg" alt="couscous1_morocco" style="margin: 4px; float: right;" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Wherever you go in Morocco, the family gathers in the early afternoon for the main meal of the day. In this case, a Berber family in the city of Ouarzazate are enjoying a meal of cous-cous. In this case, it is cous-cous with a variety of vegetables--squash, tomatoes, carrots, onions, peppers, turnips--and lamb. People eat from a big round platter and use their hands. Careful, though! There is a very serious etiquette to eating with your fingers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"><strong>Vegetable Couscous</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Carrots, fennel, zucchini, and chickpeas in a broth spicy with jalapenos, caraway, and coriander make for a full-flavored vegetarian couscous. If you want to introduce meat, sautéed merguez, the hot North African sausages, are a great way to go.<br /><br /><strong><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Wine Recommendation</span><br /></span></strong>California chardonnays (and those from Washington State or Oregon) are earthy, rich, and slightly exotic—just like this dish. As you sip a chilled glass, the wine will also provide a cooling edge to the spice and heat of the food.</td> </tr> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Ingredients:</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>1/4 cup cooking oil</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 large onion, cut into thin slices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4 carrots, cut into thin slices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 fennel bulb, cored and cut into 1-inch pieces</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 eggplant (about 3/4 pound), cut into 1/2-inch pieces</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4 cloves garlic, minced</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 jalapeno pepper, including seeds and ribs, cut diagonally into thin slices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1/4 cup tomato paste</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 teaspoons ground coriander</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 1/4 teaspoons salt</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1/4 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper</td> </tr> <tr> <td>5 1/2 cups water</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 2/3 cups drained and rinsed chickpeas (one 15-ounce can)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 1/3 cups couscous</td> </tr> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td><strong>Method</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>In a large saucepan, heat the oil over moderate heat. Add the onion, carrots, fennel, eggplant, garlic, and jalapeno. Cook, covered, until the vegetables start to soften, about 10 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, coriander, caraway seeds, 2 teaspoons of the salt, and the black pepper. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute.&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Add 3 1/2 cups of the water and bring to a&nbsp;boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, until the vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Add the chickpeas and simmer 2 minutes longer.&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, bring the remaining 2 cups of water to a boil. Add the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and the couscous. Cover. Remove the pot from the heat and let the couscous stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork. Serve the stew with its broth over the couscous. <strong>Serves Four</strong>.<br /><br />Source: AfricaWithin.com</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p><img height="256" width="384" src="images/stories/couscous1_morocco.jpg" alt="couscous1_morocco" style="margin: 4px; float: right;" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Wherever you go in Morocco, the family gathers in the early afternoon for the main meal of the day. In this case, a Berber family in the city of Ouarzazate are enjoying a meal of cous-cous. In this case, it is cous-cous with a variety of vegetables--squash, tomatoes, carrots, onions, peppers, turnips--and lamb. People eat from a big round platter and use their hands. Careful, though! There is a very serious etiquette to eating with your fingers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"><strong>Vegetable Couscous</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">Carrots, fennel, zucchini, and chickpeas in a broth spicy with jalapenos, caraway, and coriander make for a full-flavored vegetarian couscous. If you want to introduce meat, sautéed merguez, the hot North African sausages, are a great way to go.<br /><br /><strong><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">Wine Recommendation</span><br /></span></strong>California chardonnays (and those from Washington State or Oregon) are earthy, rich, and slightly exotic—just like this dish. As you sip a chilled glass, the wine will also provide a cooling edge to the spice and heat of the food.</td> </tr> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"> <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Ingredients:</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>1/4 cup cooking oil</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 large onion, cut into thin slices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4 carrots, cut into thin slices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 fennel bulb, cored and cut into 1-inch pieces</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 eggplant (about 3/4 pound), cut into 1/2-inch pieces</td> </tr> <tr> <td>4 cloves garlic, minced</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 jalapeno pepper, including seeds and ribs, cut diagonally into thin slices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1/4 cup tomato paste</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 teaspoons ground coriander</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds</td> </tr> <tr> <td>2 1/4 teaspoons salt</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1/4 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper</td> </tr> <tr> <td>5 1/2 cups water</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 2/3 cups drained and rinsed chickpeas (one 15-ounce can)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>1 1/3 cups couscous</td> </tr> <tr> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td><strong>Method</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>In a large saucepan, heat the oil over moderate heat. Add the onion, carrots, fennel, eggplant, garlic, and jalapeno. Cook, covered, until the vegetables start to soften, about 10 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, coriander, caraway seeds, 2 teaspoons of the salt, and the black pepper. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute.&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Add 3 1/2 cups of the water and bring to a&nbsp;boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, until the vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Add the chickpeas and simmer 2 minutes longer.&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, bring the remaining 2 cups of water to a boil. Add the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and the couscous. Cover. Remove the pot from the heat and let the couscous stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork. Serve the stew with its broth over the couscous. <strong>Serves Four</strong>.<br /><br />Source: AfricaWithin.com</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top"></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2011-06-26T15:12:28Z 2011-06-26T15:12:28Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=595:historic-barbados-makes-unesco-world-heritage-list&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Administrator kpope100@yahoo.com <span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 4px; float: right;" alt="Garrison-bridgetown" src="images/stories/Garrison-bridgetown.jpg" height="225" width="300" />The historic section of the capital of Barbados in June became the Caribbean country's first entry on the United Nations-managed World Heritage List after a committee of experts approved its inscription and that of two other sites. </span></span> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">&nbsp;The World Heritage Committee, meeting in Paris, said Bridgetown and its garrison deserved a place on the list, which is comprised of more than 900 cultural or natural sites around the world regarded as having outstanding universal value.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">&nbsp;The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizatio<span style="color: #000000;">n<span style="color: #000000;"> (<a href="http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/">UNESCO</a>)</span></span><span style="color: #000000;"> </span>reported that the committee found the Bridgetown site – comprised of a well-preserved old town and a nearby military garrison – to be an outstanding example of British colonial architecture.</span></span></p> <span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"> <span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 4px; float: right;" alt="Garrison-bridgetown" src="images/stories/Garrison-bridgetown.jpg" height="225" width="300" />The historic section of the capital of Barbados in June became the Caribbean country's first entry on the United Nations-managed World Heritage List after a committee of experts approved its inscription and that of two other sites. </span></span> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">&nbsp;The World Heritage Committee, meeting in Paris, said Bridgetown and its garrison deserved a place on the list, which is comprised of more than 900 cultural or natural sites around the world regarded as having outstanding universal value.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">&nbsp;The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizatio<span style="color: #000000;">n<span style="color: #000000;"> (<a href="http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/">UNESCO</a>)</span></span><span style="color: #000000;"> </span>reported that the committee found the Bridgetown site – comprised of a well-preserved old town and a nearby military garrison – to be an outstanding example of British colonial architecture.</span></span></p> <span style="font-size: 10pt;"> <span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2011-01-01T18:04:08Z 2011-01-01T18:04:08Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=487:anse-cafard-slave-memorial-in-martinique&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Steve Bennett kpope100@yahoo.com <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 6px; float: left;" alt="Anse_Slave_2" src="images/stories/Anse_Slave_2.png" width="448" height="299" />The legacy of slavery is represented in many varying forms at attractions throughout the Caribbean. In some islands, remembrances and memorials are slight and understated, almost as if to suggest that it's best to just move on. In more culturally rich islands like Martinique, however, it's quite the opposite. Poignant, provocative and powerfully moving, the collection of slave memorials here testify to the evils of slavery with a quiet dignity born of personal heartfelt artistic expression.<br /><br />Among the most moving of these attractions is the Anse Cafard Slave Memorial. Completed in 1998 in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the emancipation of slaves in the French West Indies, the memorial is comprised of 20 statues, each eight feet tall. As you can see in the photo above, these are large, hulking figures bearing stoic, brooding expressions. Shoulders hunched and heads bowed, the figures stare out to the sea from what is an otherwise pleasant and breezy grassy field. <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 6px; float: left;" alt="Anse_Slave_2" src="images/stories/Anse_Slave_2.png" width="448" height="299" />The legacy of slavery is represented in many varying forms at attractions throughout the Caribbean. In some islands, remembrances and memorials are slight and understated, almost as if to suggest that it's best to just move on. In more culturally rich islands like Martinique, however, it's quite the opposite. Poignant, provocative and powerfully moving, the collection of slave memorials here testify to the evils of slavery with a quiet dignity born of personal heartfelt artistic expression.<br /><br />Among the most moving of these attractions is the Anse Cafard Slave Memorial. Completed in 1998 in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the emancipation of slaves in the French West Indies, the memorial is comprised of 20 statues, each eight feet tall. As you can see in the photo above, these are large, hulking figures bearing stoic, brooding expressions. Shoulders hunched and heads bowed, the figures stare out to the sea from what is an otherwise pleasant and breezy grassy field. Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2010-09-21T19:48:03Z 2010-09-21T19:48:03Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=412:the-new-black-pearl-of-paris-franco-senegalese-chef-rougui-dia&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Monique Wells krissie@africandiasporatourism.com <p><strong><em>Entrée to Black Paris™ interviews noted Franco-Senegalese Chef Rougui Dia.</em></strong><br /><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="margin: 2px; vertical-align: top;" alt="Rougui_Dia_and_Arman_Petrossian_2" src="images/stories/Rougui_Dia_and_Arman_Petrossian_2.png" width="320" height="240" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">When talking about "The Black Pearl" in relation to Paris, one thinks immediately of Josephine Baker - the African-American woman who took the city by storm in a theatrical revue and rose to stardom overnight in October 1926. In 2005, Paris discovered that it had a new "Black Pearl" who was rising to stardom as quickly as Baker did. But this time, the theater was a professional kitchen, and the woman was Franco-Senegalese instead of African-American. Her promotion to head chef at a premier restaurant in the posh 7th <em>arrondissement</em></span><em> </em><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">caused nothing less than a media frenzy.</span></span></p> <p><strong><em>Entrée to Black Paris™ interviews noted Franco-Senegalese Chef Rougui Dia.</em></strong><br /><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="margin: 2px; vertical-align: top;" alt="Rougui_Dia_and_Arman_Petrossian_2" src="images/stories/Rougui_Dia_and_Arman_Petrossian_2.png" width="320" height="240" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">When talking about "The Black Pearl" in relation to Paris, one thinks immediately of Josephine Baker - the African-American woman who took the city by storm in a theatrical revue and rose to stardom overnight in October 1926. In 2005, Paris discovered that it had a new "Black Pearl" who was rising to stardom as quickly as Baker did. But this time, the theater was a professional kitchen, and the woman was Franco-Senegalese instead of African-American. Her promotion to head chef at a premier restaurant in the posh 7th <em>arrondissement</em></span><em> </em><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">caused nothing less than a media frenzy.</span></span></p> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2010-08-03T19:36:51Z 2010-08-03T19:36:51Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=357:philadelphia-still-first-in-freedom&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Kitty J. Pope krissie@africandiasporatourism.com <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><em><strong>The city’s iconic Liberty Bell, originally a symbol for the abolishment of slavery, also has ties to black history.</strong></em></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 5px; float: left;" alt="liberty_bell1" src="images/stories/liberty_bell1.png" width="258" height="235" />Most people know about the Liberty Bell, the most popular tourist attraction in Philly. But did you know that it was once a symbol that stood for the abolishment of slavery? The connection between the Liberty Bell and African-American history is revealed at the Liberty Bell Center where exhibitions, videos and interactive displays explain how the bell became the icon of freedom for American and a symbol of anti-slavery for the abolitionist movement. </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">At the main entrance to the Liberty Bell Center you will find informational panels about the enslaved Africans who worked for George Washington's during his tenure. Visitors heading to the Liberty Bell will actually walk upon the site of the quarters of slaves who worked at the President's House. A President's House Commemorative Site, slated to open in 2010 a few steps away from the Liberty Bell, will honor enslaved Africans who lived in the first Executive Mansion. </span></span></p> <span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><em><strong>The city’s iconic Liberty Bell, originally a symbol for the abolishment of slavery, also has ties to black history.</strong></em></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 5px; float: left;" alt="liberty_bell1" src="images/stories/liberty_bell1.png" width="258" height="235" />Most people know about the Liberty Bell, the most popular tourist attraction in Philly. But did you know that it was once a symbol that stood for the abolishment of slavery? The connection between the Liberty Bell and African-American history is revealed at the Liberty Bell Center where exhibitions, videos and interactive displays explain how the bell became the icon of freedom for American and a symbol of anti-slavery for the abolitionist movement. </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">At the main entrance to the Liberty Bell Center you will find informational panels about the enslaved Africans who worked for George Washington's during his tenure. Visitors heading to the Liberty Bell will actually walk upon the site of the quarters of slaves who worked at the President's House. A President's House Commemorative Site, slated to open in 2010 a few steps away from the Liberty Bell, will honor enslaved Africans who lived in the first Executive Mansion. </span></span></p> <span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2010-07-28T05:20:11Z 2010-07-28T05:20:11Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=348:festival-of-boa-morte-a-celebration-of-the-african-soul-of-the-new-world&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Peri Frances krissie@africandiasporatourism.com <p style="text-align: center;"><img height="375" width="500" src="images/stories/boamorte3.png" alt="boamorte3" style="margin: 2px; vertical-align: top;" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">In the Brazilian state of Bahia, about an hour by car from the better-known city of Salvador, lies the historic city of Cachoeira, where the <em>Irmandade de Nossa Senhora da Boa Morte</em>, Sisterhood of Our Lady of the Good Death, holds their annual mid-August festival.&nbsp;Don’t let the name fool you; there is nothing macabre about this celebration. A unique testament to the strength and endurance of the African Diaspora, Boa Morte is a festival of deep cultural, social, spiritual and religious significance, a joyful expression of life, faith and happiness. <br /><br />The Festival exemplifies the syncretism of Catholicism and traditional African religion known in Brazil as <em>Candomble</em>. The “Good Death” refers to the blending of the Feast of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary in the Catholic Church and the Candomble worship of the <em>iyas</em>, female spirits of the Ancestors. Members of the Sisterhood who have transitioned and ancestors who during slavery, died free or fighting for liberation, are also venerated.&nbsp; They all are believed to have achieved the Good Death. The Virgin Mary, because of her bodily assumption, and the ancestors, because of their struggle and ultimate freedom before or upon death, were all insured a proper passage from the material to the spiritual world.<br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img height="300" width="400" src="images/stories/boamorte4.png" alt="boamorte4" style="margin: 5px; float: left;" />The Sisterhood is said to be the oldest organization for Women of African Descent in the Americas. It is a vestige of African Secret female societies, and began more than 150 years ago in pre-abolition era Brazil. Brazil had more than four times as many Africans imported to its shores as the United States, with the majority entering the country through Bahia.&nbsp; </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">During the colonial period, Cachoeira was a rich city at the heart of the cane-growing region; its beautiful examples of Baroque architecture attest to its former opulence. It is referred to as the Heroic City because of its role in fights against the Portuguese, but for people of African decent, the Sisters of Boa Morte are its true heroes. <br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">During Colonial times when Candomble, a traditional African form of worship was outlawed, the Sisters cloaked their formation as a lay catholic sisterhood to pass down their traditions and pay homage to the <em>orixas</em>, disguised as Catholic Saints. They used their skills to earn money to buy others from servitude as well as their spiritual power and social network to provide new freed slaves protection, sanctuary and safe passage to <em>quilombos</em>, settlements of freed and escaped Africans. Brazil was the last country in the world to abolish slavery in 1888, due in part to the power and prowess of these amazing women. <br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img height="214" width="300" src="images/stories/con_women.png" alt="con_women" style="margin: 5px; float: right;" />During the incredible festival of all-night vigils, masses, processions, and feasts, the current Sisterhood show their gratitude and reverence to <em>Nossa Sehnora</em> who answered their prayers for freedom and to the original ancestors of the sisterhood by commemorating their death and ascension. <br /><br />Traveling to Cachoeira for Boa Morte was my first experience outside of Brazil’s major metropolitan areas; in contrast to it’s more urbane Neighbor Salvador, better known Rio or bustling Sao Paolo, at first glance Cachoiera seems a sleepy, beautiful, but somewhat faded, almost abandoned colonial town. But as with the Virgin Mary who masks the Candomble rites and rituals, nothing at Boa Morte is exactly as it seems. </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img height="388" width="335" src="images/stories/boamorte1.png" alt="boamorte1" style="margin: 5px; float: left;" />As each day of the festival passes, the energy builds, people descend upon the City from every direction in tour buses, cars and taxis and the ceremonies begin to take a more secular than religious tone. Sound systems appear, and a carnival atmosphere develops. <em>Bahianas</em>, female vendors dressed in white with huge full skirts and colorful head scarves set up shop along the streets serving all manner of delights, most notably <em>acarajé</em>, black-eye peas fritters fried in palm oil, with a spicy shrimp sauce and vegetables, which is served like a sort of Brazilian Falafel or taco and is a signature dish of Bahia.<br /><br />On the final day the sisters become festive, with the black shawls and somber faces of the processions long gone they treat the crowds to a swirling, whirling solo dance inside a crowded circle known as <em>Samba de Roda</em>. Decked out in their jewels and white eyelet they dance and spin at the center of a circle of onlookers defying their mostly septuagenarian status. While much of the sacred rituals of Boa Morte are reserved for the members of the Sisterhood, the Samba de Roda is a public exhilarating, magical celebration of life and freedom. <br /><br /><strong>Tips on Travel to Boa Morte:</strong></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- There aren’t many hotels or inns in Cachoeira, most tour groups travel back and forth to Salvador, some accommodations may be available at smaller pousadas or guest houses, but book far in advance. If you decide to stay, be flexible, you have left the big city, and some of it’s comforts<br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- Wear or bring white clothing for the procession. <br /></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- You will see many other African American tourists, increasingly the Festival attracts people from across the diaspora.<br /></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- Wear comfortable shoes, many streets are cobblestone and when the Samba starts you will want to jump in!<br /></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- Expect that you will not want to leave! On my trip to Cachoeira I purchased a t-shirt that says it all, it reads in Portuguese:<br />“Globalization is when you are dreaming of Cachoeira, but you wake up in New York”</span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><em>Photo Credit: Right, Courtesy of VisionsofBrazil.com; All others courtesy of the author</em><br /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img height="375" width="500" src="images/stories/boamorte3.png" alt="boamorte3" style="margin: 2px; vertical-align: top;" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">In the Brazilian state of Bahia, about an hour by car from the better-known city of Salvador, lies the historic city of Cachoeira, where the <em>Irmandade de Nossa Senhora da Boa Morte</em>, Sisterhood of Our Lady of the Good Death, holds their annual mid-August festival.&nbsp;Don’t let the name fool you; there is nothing macabre about this celebration. A unique testament to the strength and endurance of the African Diaspora, Boa Morte is a festival of deep cultural, social, spiritual and religious significance, a joyful expression of life, faith and happiness. <br /><br />The Festival exemplifies the syncretism of Catholicism and traditional African religion known in Brazil as <em>Candomble</em>. The “Good Death” refers to the blending of the Feast of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary in the Catholic Church and the Candomble worship of the <em>iyas</em>, female spirits of the Ancestors. Members of the Sisterhood who have transitioned and ancestors who during slavery, died free or fighting for liberation, are also venerated.&nbsp; They all are believed to have achieved the Good Death. The Virgin Mary, because of her bodily assumption, and the ancestors, because of their struggle and ultimate freedom before or upon death, were all insured a proper passage from the material to the spiritual world.<br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img height="300" width="400" src="images/stories/boamorte4.png" alt="boamorte4" style="margin: 5px; float: left;" />The Sisterhood is said to be the oldest organization for Women of African Descent in the Americas. It is a vestige of African Secret female societies, and began more than 150 years ago in pre-abolition era Brazil. Brazil had more than four times as many Africans imported to its shores as the United States, with the majority entering the country through Bahia.&nbsp; </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">During the colonial period, Cachoeira was a rich city at the heart of the cane-growing region; its beautiful examples of Baroque architecture attest to its former opulence. It is referred to as the Heroic City because of its role in fights against the Portuguese, but for people of African decent, the Sisters of Boa Morte are its true heroes. <br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">During Colonial times when Candomble, a traditional African form of worship was outlawed, the Sisters cloaked their formation as a lay catholic sisterhood to pass down their traditions and pay homage to the <em>orixas</em>, disguised as Catholic Saints. They used their skills to earn money to buy others from servitude as well as their spiritual power and social network to provide new freed slaves protection, sanctuary and safe passage to <em>quilombos</em>, settlements of freed and escaped Africans. Brazil was the last country in the world to abolish slavery in 1888, due in part to the power and prowess of these amazing women. <br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img height="214" width="300" src="images/stories/con_women.png" alt="con_women" style="margin: 5px; float: right;" />During the incredible festival of all-night vigils, masses, processions, and feasts, the current Sisterhood show their gratitude and reverence to <em>Nossa Sehnora</em> who answered their prayers for freedom and to the original ancestors of the sisterhood by commemorating their death and ascension. <br /><br />Traveling to Cachoeira for Boa Morte was my first experience outside of Brazil’s major metropolitan areas; in contrast to it’s more urbane Neighbor Salvador, better known Rio or bustling Sao Paolo, at first glance Cachoiera seems a sleepy, beautiful, but somewhat faded, almost abandoned colonial town. But as with the Virgin Mary who masks the Candomble rites and rituals, nothing at Boa Morte is exactly as it seems. </span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img height="388" width="335" src="images/stories/boamorte1.png" alt="boamorte1" style="margin: 5px; float: left;" />As each day of the festival passes, the energy builds, people descend upon the City from every direction in tour buses, cars and taxis and the ceremonies begin to take a more secular than religious tone. Sound systems appear, and a carnival atmosphere develops. <em>Bahianas</em>, female vendors dressed in white with huge full skirts and colorful head scarves set up shop along the streets serving all manner of delights, most notably <em>acarajé</em>, black-eye peas fritters fried in palm oil, with a spicy shrimp sauce and vegetables, which is served like a sort of Brazilian Falafel or taco and is a signature dish of Bahia.<br /><br />On the final day the sisters become festive, with the black shawls and somber faces of the processions long gone they treat the crowds to a swirling, whirling solo dance inside a crowded circle known as <em>Samba de Roda</em>. Decked out in their jewels and white eyelet they dance and spin at the center of a circle of onlookers defying their mostly septuagenarian status. While much of the sacred rituals of Boa Morte are reserved for the members of the Sisterhood, the Samba de Roda is a public exhilarating, magical celebration of life and freedom. <br /><br /><strong>Tips on Travel to Boa Morte:</strong></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- There aren’t many hotels or inns in Cachoeira, most tour groups travel back and forth to Salvador, some accommodations may be available at smaller pousadas or guest houses, but book far in advance. If you decide to stay, be flexible, you have left the big city, and some of it’s comforts<br /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- Wear or bring white clothing for the procession. <br /></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- You will see many other African American tourists, increasingly the Festival attracts people from across the diaspora.<br /></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- Wear comfortable shoes, many streets are cobblestone and when the Samba starts you will want to jump in!<br /></span></span><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;">- Expect that you will not want to leave! On my trip to Cachoeira I purchased a t-shirt that says it all, it reads in Portuguese:<br />“Globalization is when you are dreaming of Cachoeira, but you wake up in New York”</span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><em>Photo Credit: Right, Courtesy of VisionsofBrazil.com; All others courtesy of the author</em><br /></span></span></p> Viagra » Online canadian pharmacy. Time to buy Cialis online Without Prescription! 2010-06-24T17:14:29Z 2010-06-24T17:14:29Z http://africandiasporatourism.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=317:a-culinary-tour-of-liberia&catid=91:culture-1&Itemid=134 Helene Cooper krissie@africandiasporatourism.com <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 4px; float: left;" alt="Musus_Bar" src="images/stories/Musus_Bar.gif" width="500" height="283" />I KNEW my plan to spend my recent trip home eating my way around Monrovia was off to a good start when my sister showed up at the airport to greet me accompanied by a pot of bitterleaf over doughy fufu. <br /><br />My mom and I, jet-lagged and woozy, peered into the trunk of Eunice’s car. I snatched the cover off the pot. The scent — a pungent mix of palm oil, smoked fish, juicy crawfish, roasted beef and the leafy spinach-like bitterleaf greens — hit my system as swiftly as a strong shot of espresso. Into the stew went a greedy finger; I was licking the sauce before Eunice could smack my hand away.&nbsp; <br /><br /></span><a target="_blank" href="http://travel.nytimes.com/2010/06/20/travel/20PersonalJourney.html?ref=travel"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Read More</span></span></a><em><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"></span></em></span><!--close legend --> <!--close insetH --></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><img style="margin: 4px; float: left;" alt="Musus_Bar" src="images/stories/Musus_Bar.gif" width="500" height="283" />I KNEW my plan to spend my recent trip home eating my way around Monrovia was off to a good start when my sister showed up at the airport to greet me accompanied by a pot of bitterleaf over doughy fufu. <br /><br />My mom and I, jet-lagged and woozy, peered into the trunk of Eunice’s car. I snatched the cover off the pot. The scent — a pungent mix of palm oil, smoked fish, juicy crawfish, roasted beef and the leafy spinach-like bitterleaf greens — hit my system as swiftly as a strong shot of espresso. Into the stew went a greedy finger; I was licking the sauce before Eunice could smack my hand away.&nbsp; <br /><br /></span><a target="_blank" href="http://travel.nytimes.com/2010/06/20/travel/20PersonalJourney.html?ref=travel"><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Read More</span></span></a><em><span style="font-family: verdana,geneva;"></span></em></span><!--close legend --> <!--close insetH --></p>